Monday, July 25, 2016

Cheesy Chile Corn Muffins (Gluten Free) #MuffinMonday

This gluten free muffin has fresh corn kernels, roasted chiles, and cheddar cheese folded into a cornmeal muffin base. It's terrific with a bowl of chili. It's MuffinMonday, do you know where your muffins are? I've got mine right here.

a plate of gluten free corn muffins with cheddar, Hatch chiles, and fresh corn kernels

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I'm taking a break from the near constant flow of salsa (as evidenced by my Peach and Golden Plum Salsa, my Salsa Verde with Roasted Hatch Chiles, and my Roasted Corn and Chile Salsa) for another seasonal recipe that uses some of the same ripe seasonal veggies that I scurry around putting up each summer: corn and peppers.


gluten free cheesy chile corn muffins served with a bowl of chili


When I moved to Ohio I discovered how easy it is to get piles of fresh corn on the cob. Sweet mercy, there are wagons heaped with fresh corn that appear in parking lots each July! My local grocery store's corn supplier is out picking EVERY MORNING and delivering daily. How can I NOT partake of all this bounty?

Friday, July 22, 2016

Roasted Corn and Hatch Chile Salsa (Canning Recipe)

This tangy salsa combines seasonal vegetables--corn, tomatoes, and peppers--into a base perfect for blending to make your own twist. This recipe can be canned so you can easily whip up summer flavors any time of year. Try it mixed with black beans, or chunks of avocado, stirred into taco meat or layered on a taco salad.

a dish of roasted corn and Hatch chile salsa surrounded by tortilla chips


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a busy kitchen counter with tomatoes and peppers waiting to be prepped
What my kitchen looked like when I made this recipe. I was also pickling banana peppers and canning pizza sauce.


Ok let's get a few things straight.  First, I work on this site about a year ahead. That means what I am posting now are recipes I made & photographed a year ago. I do this mainly because by the time I get the photos edited and I'm ready to publish a post . . . I've missed the season.



a top down view of canning jars in a pasta pot
A top down view of my tall pasta pot that I use for smaller canning projects. This holds half pint and pint jars easily, but when canning quart size jars I'd rather use a full size canning pot. I inherited this pot from my mom.

I mean, I harvested my garlic scapes in June, stuck them in the fridge, and didn't make my annual batch of Garlic Scape & Pistachio Pesto until July. It makes no sense to me to offer ideas for what you could have done with your fresh produce from your Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) farm share at a time when you no longer have that item to work with. So I opt to make, photograph, and sit on the recipes until I can post just in advance of when folks would be receiving their farm shares.


a close up view of roasted corn and hatch chile salsa



Second, as this month's recipes are showing, I made a lot of salsa last year. I'm so comfortable with salsa making that I'm teaching a salsa (how to can the tomato kind, not the dancing kind) class at my local community center next month. This year my cucumber vines are the darlings of the garden, so I am putting up several quarts of pickles each week. We'll do some taste testing over the winter and decide what's worthy of the website for next year.



the ingredients for roasted corn and hatch chile salsa
The ingredients for roasted corn and Hatch chile salsa--I used a many colored bell peppers from the farm share.


Third, if nobody likes a recipe, it doesn't get up on the website.  This recipe narrowly made it here. I don't care for the salsa straight out of the jar. It's too limey for my tastes, though I understand that to boiling water bath process these low acid vegetables you've got to add additional acid so that they are safely preserved.  I know that taste is subjective, and maybe someone else likes that amount of tang.

Monday, July 18, 2016

Salsa Verde with Roasted Hatch Chiles (Canning recipe)

This tangy green salsa gets bright flavors from tomatillos and roasted Hatch chiles for a smooth dipping sauce that is also excellent in baked dishes. This canning recipe provides ample stores to enjoy the flavor year round.


an assortment of jars of canned goods


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close up of a home-canned jar of salsa verde with roasted hatch chiles


This salsa is one of the easiest canning projects I've done--very little chopping, doesn't matter if you've chopped uniformly or not, only a few ingredients to measure. The immersion blender (and the chile roaster at my local grocery store) do the bulk of the work. The hardest part for me last year was sourcing the tomatillos.


tomatillos being chopped for salsa verde with roasted hatch chiles



In previous years I'd get ample amounts of tomatillos in my Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) farm share. In fact, that's how I started making salsa verde. My first time making salsa verde was NOT born from a desire to eat salsa verde, but from a lack of anything else to do with the tomatillos that were sitting on the counter!



tomatillo plants in the garden, showing the balloons that will become tomatillo fruits


After the initial batch, we got hooked on this tangy concoction. Last year I had difficulty sourcing enough local tomatillos to make a batch. I even spent 2 Saturdays hitting up various farmer's markets in order to get enough. This year I'm growing my own tomatillos. So far, so good. Wish me luck!


a square image of jars of salsa verde and tomatoes from the canner


No Hatch chiles? No problem! Simply use the hot pepper that's available to you. It doesn't even matter if you roast it or not--the flavor will be different if using roasted peppers, but the recipe works either way. I can't give you any roasting tips because I buy my chiles already roasted. I picked up a container of roasted Hatch chiles once on a whim and I loved the flavor so much I come back year after year for more. Roasted chiles freeze well, so what doesn't get put up in salsas in the summertime gets used throughout the year. This year I'm going to try my hand at making chile rellenos with a quart, since we discovered that amazing concoction while Eating Locally on the Road last summer.


You could cool and eat this salsa right away, but I'm also giving canning instructions because this is my spouse's favorite salsa (mine is my Peach, Yellow Plum and Hatch Chile salsa recipe) and we eat salsa all year long. It's a terrific after school or pre-dinner snack, especially if you have family members who need to eat RIGHT NOW while you're standing in the kitchen finishing dinner preparations. Not that it's ever happened to me.
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